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Industrial Revolution

Industrial Revolution
Life Before The Industrial Revolution
--Types Of Industry
--Lifestyle Of The People
--Quality Of Life
Beginnings In England
--How It All Started
Spread Of Industry
--Where Did It Spread?
--How Was It Funded?
Major Inventions
Impact On Society
--Lifestyles And Working Conditions
--Quality Of Life
Impact On Movement
--Changes To Transport
Impact On Industry
--How Was Industry Changed?
Impact On Environment
Vocabulary
Bibliography

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This website is all about the Industrial Revolution, how it became, how it spread and all other information you will need to know about the Industrial Revolution.

The Industrial Revolution was the major shift of technological, social economic and cultural conditions in the late 18th and early 19th century that began in Britain and spread throughout the world. During that time, an economy based on manual labour was replaced by one dominated by industry and the manufacture of machinery. It began with the mechanisation of the textile industries and the development of iron-making techniques, and trade expansion was enabled by the introduction of canals, improved roads and railways. The introduction of steam power (fuelled primarily by coal) and powered machinery (mainly in tectile manufacturing) underpinned the dramatic increases in production capacity. The development of all-metal machine toos in the first two decades of the 19th century facilitated the manufacture of more production machines for manufacturing in other industries.

The period of time covered by the Industrial Revolution varies with different historians. Eric Hobsbawm held that it 'broke out' in the 1780s and was not fully felt until the 1830s or 1840s, while T.S Ashton held that it occurred roughly between 1760 and 1830 (in effect the reigns of George III, The Regency, and George IV).

The effects spread throughout Western Europe and Norht America during the 19th century, eventually affecting most of the world. The impact of this change on society was enormous and is often compared to the Neolithic Revolution, when various human subgroups embraced agriculture and in the process, forswore the nomadic lifestyle.

The first Industrial Revolution merged into the Second Industrial Revolution around 1850, when technological and economic progress gained momentum with the development of steam-powered ships, railways, and later in the nineteenth century with the internal combustion engine and electrical power generator. At the turn of the century, innovator Henry Ford, father of the assembly line, stated, "There is but one rule for the industrialist, and that is: Make the highest quality goods possible at the lowest cost possible, paying the highest wages possible."

It has been argued that GDP per capita was much more stable and progressed at a much slower rate until the Industrial Revolution and the emergence of the modern capitalist economy, and that it has since increased rapidly in capitalist countries.

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