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Industrial Revolution

Impact On Society

Industrial Revolution
Life Before The Industrial Revolution
--Types Of Industry
--Lifestyle Of The People
--Quality Of Life
Beginnings In England
--How It All Started
Spread Of Industry
--Where Did It Spread?
--How Was It Funded?
Major Inventions
Impact On Society
--Lifestyles And Working Conditions
--Quality Of Life
Impact On Movement
--Changes To Transport
Impact On Industry
--How Was Industry Changed?
Impact On Environment
Vocabulary
Bibliography

Social Effects:

In terms of social structure, the Industrial Revolution witnessed the triumph of a middle class of industrialists and businessmen over a landed class of nobility & gentry.

Ordinary working people found increased opportunities for employment in the new mills and factories but these were often under strict working conditions with long hours of labour dominated by a pace set by machines. Harsh working conditions were prevalent long before the industrial revolution took place as well. Pre-industrial society was very static and often cruel-child labour, dirty living conditions and long working hours were just as prevalent before the Industrial Revolution.

The application of steam power to the industrial processes of printing supported a massive expansion of newspaper and popular book publishing, which reinforced rising literacy and demands for mass political participation.

During the Industrial Revolution, the life expectancy of children increased dramatically. The percentage of the children born in London who died before the age of five decreased from 74.5% in 1730 - 1749 to 31.8% in 1810 - 1829. Besides, there was a significant increase in worker wages during the period 1813-1913.

The Industrial Revolution had significant impacts on the structure of society. Prior to its rise, the public and private spheres held strong overlaps; work was often conducted through the home and thus was shared in many cases by wife and husband. However, during this period the two began to separate, with work and home life considered quite distinct from one another. This shift made it necessary for one partner to maintain the home and care for children. Women, holding the distinction of being able to breastfeed, thus more often maintained the home, with men making up a sizeable fraction of the workforce. With much of the family income coming from men, then, their power in relation to women increased further, with the latter often dependent on men's income. This had enormous impacts on the defining of gender roles and was effectively the model for what was later termed the traditional family.

However, the need for a large workforce and resulting wages also enticed many women into industrial work, where they were often paid much less in relation to men. This was mostly because of a lack of organised labour among women to push for benefits and wage increases, and in part to ensure women's continued dependence on a man's income to survive